“Day with the Dolphins” raises awareness of little-known sea creatures

Zoey Heinrich, In-depth editor

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On Friday, the Aquarium Club and boys’ water polo team will be collaborating to host BG’s first annual “Day with the Dolphins.” During all lunch periods, students with a 2.8 GPA or higher will be able to swim with little-known sea creatures, dolphins, in the pool for $5. All proceeds will go towards the Dolphin Awareness Foundation.

“It’s a really good cause,” Aquarium Club member freshman Dole-Finn Laufer said. “A lot of people haven’t heard of dolphins before, and I think it’s really important to know what they are.”

According to Oxford Dictionary, a dolphin is “a small gregarious toothed whale.” As requested by the Dolphin Awareness Foundation, this definition will be hung around the school along with fun facts about the unusual critter on the day of the event.

A few of the male dolphins will also be competing with the boys’ water polo team for the rest of the season. Though producing dolphin-sized uniforms was a struggle, the dolphins have proven themselves valuable members of the team through their unstoppable motivation and quick reflexes.

“Man, I wish they competed with the diving team,” varsity diver junior Dave Ingbord said. “They’re so cute. I can’t believe I didn’t even know they existed until now.”

Dolphin Swih Mar was promoted to captain after leading the boys’ water polo team to victory at their first meet. Mar shocked onlookers after swimming over 1000 mph during a few of the most crucial moments of the game, breaking multiple school records and splashing water everywhere.

“Ack ack ack nyuh brrrh ah acky ack ah,” Mar said.

Getting caught up in the excitement of the success of the team and “Day with the Dolphins” is a completely normal and anticipated response. It’s important to keep in mind the true purpose of both events: to raise awareness about dolphins.

“When this is over, I hope every single student, regardless of their age, gender or ethnic background, will be able to identify what a dolphin is,” Laufer said. “At the end of the day, that’s what really matters.”

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